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Natural Resource Management
NATURAL
ENVIRONMENT
 
Natural Environment

Natural Environment

CeRDI’s eResearch in the Natural Environment collaborative research program spans a range of areas, including groundwater, soil health, water and estuary health, natural resource management planning and biodiversity, reflective of the multidisciplinary nature of CeRDI's research as well as long-term collaborative research relationships with a diverse range of industry and government partners.

PROJECTS

Visualising Victoria’s Groundwater

Visualising Victoria's Groundwater - Web portal relaunch

Visualising Victoria’s Groundwater (VVG) is an innovative technology offering a real-time, centralised site for Victoria’s ground water information, a resource normally invisible to the public. VVG consolidates data from over 400,000 bores from four authoritative sources together with Victorian aquifer information with features that include spatial visualisations, hydrogeological models and historical records and maps. In 2018, an updated and modernised VVG portal was launched offering extensive new functionality and content. Continue reading...
 

Native Fish Report Card

Native Fish Report Card

Native fish are valued by Victorians. The Native Fish Report Card Program is the first time that scientific fish population surveys have been used to produce publicly-available report cards on important recreational and non-recreational native freshwater fish in Victoria. Continue reading...
 

An evaluation of proponent environmental data under the EPBC Act

An evaluation of proponent environmental data under the EPBC Act

This collaborative project between CSIRO Land and Water, CeRDI and ThinkPlace aimed to explore proponent data generation as part of the referral process under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). The primary goal was to determine the value and nature of environmental impact assessment (EIA) data and their potential for reuse in other areas of government decision making. Continue reading...
 

Natural Resource Management Planning

Natural Resource Management Planning

The Corangamite Natural Resource Management Planning Portal (NRM Planning Portal) is an innovative approach to collaborative, integrated catchment management by providing the tools and information for communities and agencies to identify joint priorities for catchment management. The NRM Planning Portal enables information, knowledge and environmental datasets to be shared, allowing participants to exchange insights about land management in a collaborative online environment. Continue reading...
 

Corangamite Soil Health Knowledge Base

Corangamite Soil Health Knowledge Base

The Corangamite Soil Health Knowledge Base is a repository of soil health information for the Corangamite region of Victoria. It assists land managers and other stakeholders to implement catchment management plans across the region. The Knowledge Base was developed in collaboration with Corangamite CMA and was awarded the 2015 Victorian Spatial Excellence Award and the 2015 Asia Pacific Spatial Excellence Award, Environment and Sustainability category. Continue reading...
 

Western Australia Healthy Estuaries Portal

Western Australia Healthy Estuaries Portal

CeRDI developed the Healthy Estuaries portal for Northern Agricultural Catchments Council (NACC) in Western Australia based on the EstuaryWatch Victoria site. Continue reading...
 

National Waterbug Blitz

National Waterbug Blitz

The National Waterbug Blitz is Australia’s first nationwide citizen science, waterway monitoring event. Citizen scientists will uncover clues for assessing the health of their local waterways and wetlands by exploring and identifying the waterbugs that live in them. Continue reading...
 

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Discover the living Moorabool

Discover the Living Moorabool: Corangamite CMA

CeRDI and the Corangamite Catchment Management Authority (CCMA) have been collaborating on the Rivers 2040 Moorabool River project, culminating in the launch of the Discover the Living Moorabool website. Continue reading...
 

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Waterwatch and EstuaryWatch

Waterwatch and EstuaryWatch

Recently redeveloped by CeRDI, the Waterwatch and EstuaryWatch portals are companion sites supporting two significant citizen science programs that monitor the health of Victorian waterways and estuaries. The portals provide essential resources for all members to access current information and data, as well as providing the public full access to data and knowledge generated by the programs. Continue reading...
 

The State Wide Integrated Flora and Fauna Teams

The State Wide Integrated Flora and Fauna Teams

The State Wide Integrated Flora and Fauna Teams (SWIFFT) is an initiative to advance citizen science by facilitating awareness and the sharing of knowledge in relation to biodiversity conservation and threatened species for Victoria..Continue reading...
 

Visualising Victoria’s Biodiversity

Visualising Victoria's Biodiversity

Visualising Victoria's Biodiversity (VVB) is an online portal that provides the Victorian community with access to a wide range of spatial information on Victoria's environmental values, conservation activities and research. The portal federates and visualises environmental data from national, state, regional and local sources in an interactive spatial interface. It also offers the opportunity for the community to contribute information and exchange locally relevant data and knowledge. VVB is a partner site to the SWIFFT (State-wide Integrated Flora and Fauna Teams) initiative. Continue reading...
 

South Australia (SA) Tree Watch

South Australia (SA) Tree Watch

The SA Tree Watch project aims to collect spatially-explicit data and citizen science observations on patterns of tree health decline in South Australian rural landscapes using a custom-built web-based platform. Continue reading...
 

Tracking the migration of Latham's Snipe

Tracking the Migration of Latham's Snipe

The Latham's Snipe project was initiated to better understand the ecology and habitat use of Latham's snipe (Gallinago hardwickii), a shorebird species that breeds in Japan and migrates to Australia for the austral spring-summer. Using light-level geolocators deployed on snipe in Port Fairy, south-west Victoria, the first ever full migration track for the species has been obtained. The Latham's Snipe Project is supported by CeRDI, the Australia Japan Foundation and the Woodland and Wetlands Trust. Continue reading...
 

Leadbeater’s Possum Interactive Map

Leadbeater's Possum Interactive Map

In collaboration with staff at the Victorian Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), CeRDI has developed a web-based interactive map for spatial information on the Leadbeater's Possum, Victoria's faunal emblem and a critically endangered species. The interactive map enables access to the most current information on population colonies, modelled areas of occupancy, population survey areas and forest management.Continue reading...
 

Gunaikurnai Online Information Hub

Gunaikurnai Online Information Hub

The Gunaikurnai Information Hub provides support for the joint management of parks and reserves of the Appointed Lands of the Gunaikurnai people, the Traditional Owners of Gippsland, with the Traditional Owners playing a central role in managing these lands into the future. Continue reading...
 

Wildlife Survey Open Data Collections

Wildlife Survey Open Data Collections

The project, funded by the Australian National Data Service (ANDS), provides open access to research data from two FedUni wildlife surveys: An avian study undertaken in the Boola Boola Forest area of Gippsland in south-eastern Australia; and a systematic study of birdlife in the Lower Jinsha Valley in western China. Continue reading...
 

Land Your Career

Land Your Career

Land Your Career is part of a larger project - the Integrated Land Management Curriculum for Victoria (ILMCV) - which involves a unique teaching and training partnership between six tertiary education providers across 18 locations in Victoria's west. Continue reading...
 

River Detectives

River Detectives

River Detectives is a program being offered in some regions across Victoria to support educators to explore local waterways and catchments with students. River Detectives includes hands on activities and supporting resources. CeRDI has recently completed an upgrade to the River Detectives website to integration with the Waterwatch database and interactive maps. Continue reading...
 

Beach Usage Research

Beach Usage Research

CeRDI has been commissioned by the Barwon Coast Committee of Management to undertake research to understand and inform a range of complex coastal usage and environmental management issues being experienced across the Barwon coast. The research will provide an evidence base about the social, seasonal and culture issues that influence how different community groups use and identify with the coastal environment throughout the year. Continue reading...
 

HIGHER DEGREE BY RESEARCH STUDENTS

The Impact of Using Stormwater to Supply a City image

Impact of using stormwater to supply a city

PhD Candidate: David Ebbs

As population increases, communities become more urbanised and water use increases, it becomes more difficult for traditional water supplies to meet demand. Urbanisation also has environmental impacts on the downstream waterways. Continue reading...
 

Citizens as Monitors - Crowdsourcing for Water Policy Development

Linking community and waterway management through citizen science

PhD Candidate: Patrick Bonney

The potential for citizen science to foster productive connections between community and government has been paralleled by a clear policy agenda within governments world-wide to proactively draw on this resource to inform waterway planning and policy development. Continue reading...
 

RESEARCH CONTEXT

Research Context

Referred to as the New Digital Age (Schmidt and Cohen 2013), or era of Big Data (e.g. Boyd and Crawford 2012; Mayer-Schonberger and Cukier 2013) the present time period provides unprecedented opportunities for a deeper understanding and appreciation of our global environments. The volume of digital data on natural environments has grown exponentially, especially in the physical (e.g. Lynch 2008; Bell et al. 2009) and environmental sciences (e.g. Porter et al. 2012) where much of it is collected by sensors. In addition, data availability has vastly improved as governments in many countries adopt open data policies (Zuiderwijk and Janssen 2014).

Ubiquitous internet technologies provide access to all this data, particularly when that information is delivered on demand via high speed broadband to mobile tablet devices. These technologies have created a society that is spatially enabled and aware. Big business and citizens increasingly expect to be able to access past and current information about any location of interest, to find answers to their spatial queries. Deeper appreciation and understanding comes from the sheer volume of information that can be amassed about any particular place in the landscape, and how that information can be dynamically synthesised to provide the most definitive answer to the user's question.

Hence the use of spatial digital technologies for a more holistic understanding of river catchments, landscapes, biodiversity and environmental sustainability are rapidly emerging areas of eResearch. Recent examples in the international scientific literature include: the UK's Environmental Virtual Observatory project (EVO) which aims to make environmental data more visible and accessible for catchment management (Gurney et al. 2011) and includes visualisation tools for communicating flood risk (e.g. Wilkinson et al. 2013); the web delivery of interoperable water data with Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards (e.g. Boston et al. 2015); landscape visualisations that integrate GIS with augmented reality (e.g. Ghadirian and Bishop 2008); and 3D landscape visualisations for participatory landscape planning (e.g. Wissen et al. 2008; Salter et al. 2009). Experimental tools that use sensors for weed management (e.g Thorp and Tian 2004; Berge et al. 2012), or soil moisture (e.g. Phillips et al. 2014); or monitoring fauna (e.g. Di Cerbo and Biancardi 2013), have also been developed. Similarly, experiments with novel deployment of sensors, such as using unmanned vehicles to improve environmental data collection (e.g. de Sousa and Andrade Goncalves 2011); portable laser scanners for environmental monitoring (e.g. Zlot et al. 2014) and 3D, 4D and augmented reality visualisations, usually at iconic heritage sites (e.g. Guhathakurta et al. 2009; Norris et al. 2014; Petty et al. 2014), have also been published. And a plethora of websites and mobile applications (Apps) are now available to assist the ecologist, farmer, pedologist and hydrologist in on-ground decision making.

With the global shift to smaller governments, an increasing volume of data and most of the decision tools (such as Apps) are now generated in the private sector, particularly the service industries in the environmental, water, energy and agricultural sectors.

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